404

Sorry!

Page Not Found

The page you are looking for might have been removed, had its name changed, or is temporarily unavailable.

Please try using our search box below to look for information on the internet.

Debunking Net Neutrality Myths:
A Series of One pagers

Part I: Debunking "The Net is Neutral" Myth

By cleverly framing this debate around the bumper-sticker term "net neutrality," those who want to regulate broadband like dialup, created a very helpful myth to bolster their pro-Internet regulation cause.

By insinuating that the net was neutral, it made the proposed regulation sound less onerous and threatening, and more virtuous. Too bad it wasn't true. The Internet is not a "neutral," equal, one tier network.

If people knew the facts and not the spin, I believe they would be much less inclined to support the net neutrality concept. That's why I have begun a series of one-pagers that debunk these big myths promoted by the neutr-elitists.

No net neutrality myth is bigger than "the net is neutral today."

In a nutshell, the one pager provides a detailed rebuttal of the assertion "the net is neutral."

Read more on Debunking "The Net is Neutral" Myth

Part II: Debunking the "Broadband Market Failure" Myth

Most net neutrality proponents try to justify their call for new regulation by claiming a duopoly or insufficient competition. Their incomplete and out-of-context argument is a good example of why in a court of law, courts ask people to testify to "the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth." On the subject of broadband competition, the neutr-elitists are not saying the whole truth and nothing but the truth.

The big and egregious omission in their assertion is that this market used to used to be monopoly dial-up service. They omit sharing that in 1996 a bipartisan Congress passed the Telecom Act to end monopoly, promote competition and de-regulation, and that competition is now increasingly flourishing.

Net neutrality proponents must take info out of context to make their point because on the measures that matter most to consumers: expanding choice, falling prices and increasing competitive supply -- all prove an increasingly competitive market.

As my new Debunking "the Broadband Market Failure" Myth one-pager proves: choice of broadband providers is expanding rapidly according to most recent FCC data; real prices for broadband have fallen over 50% in the last few years, and the supply of new broadband competitors continues to increase.

Net neutrality has become a smokescreen to hide behind for those who oppose competition and free markets for communications and who want to turn back the clock and return to utility regulation.

Read more on Debunking "the Broadband Market Failure" Myth

Part III: Debunking the "Broadband Competition Can't Work" Myth

Unfounded pessimism and fear about the future of broadband competition is behind the call for net neutrality. I have released the third one-pager in my series: "Debunking the "Broadband Competition Can't Work" Myth

What I have done in these two very important analyses is first show why broadband competition is flourishing today, and in this new on why we can be confident that broadband competition will continue to flourish and increase in the future.

Net Neutrality is all about dueling visions of what the future of the net should be. Net neutrality proponents look at potentialities and fear the the Net will change for the worse warranting preemptive action to prevent it. Net competition proponents look at the facts and see every reason for optimism that the current competitive trajectory of the Internet and broadband will continue.

The thrust of my argument that broadband competition will continue to flourish in the future is summarized below.

Read more on the "Broadband Competition Can't Work" Myth

 

Error 404 Not Found | Net Competition
404

Sorry!

Page Not Found

The page you are looking for might have been removed, had its name changed, or is temporarily unavailable.

Please try using our search box below to look for information on the internet.